"Wellington Suspension Bridge"


"Wellington Suspension Bridge", Aberdeen

"The Wellington Suspension Bridge is a suspension bridge crossing the River Dee from Ferryhill to Craiglug in Aberdeen north east Scotland. Designed by Captain Samuel Brown and the Aberdeen City Architect John Smith it was opened to pedestrians in November 1830 and to traffic in May 1831. Closed in 1984 to vehicles and then pedestrians in 2002 it was restored in 2006/07 and pedestrian use was re-instated in 2008." "Intro The Wellington Suspension Bridge is a suspension bridge crossing the River Dee from Ferryhill to Craiglug in Aberdeen north east Scotland. Designed by Captain Samuel Brown and the Aberdeen City Architect John Smith it was opened to pedestrians in November 1830 and to traffic in May 1831. Closed in 1984 to vehicles and then pedestrians in 2002 it was restored in 2006/07 and pedestrian use was re-instated in 2008. HistoryAberdeen was undergoing rapid expansion in the Menzies family of Pitfodels wished to capitalise on the opportunities arising from the establishment of the turnpike road between Aberdeen and Stonehaven in 1799. A series of legal disputes as to exact ownership of the lands ended in arbitration.An Act of Parliament was even a cousin of James Abernethy. Abernethy was the engineer who supervised the work.In March 1830 the trustees chose to name the bridge after the Iron Duke Wellington although it is also known as the Chain Bridge and the Craiglug Bridge. The foundation stone was put in place in 1829 and the bridge was in pedestrian use from November 1830. Six months later in May 1831 it was opened to use by vehicles.The costs of building the bridge totalled £10 000. ConstructionPairs of bar-link saddle chains one above another with suspender rods hold the deck which is 220ft in length and 22ft wide. Thomas Telford's method of ""three lines of rectangular cross-section eye-bar links with short connecting links and cross-bolted"" was copied from his 1822 Menai Suspension Bridge construction. The chains were inst one above the other with a dip of 18ft giving a span ratio of 1:12. James Slight described the bridge as ""the strongest bridge that Capt. Brown has yet erected"" and he assessed the highest chain stress was around ""812 tons sq. in. and all the bars were proved to 9 tons sq. in."" The chains Forman and Son of Pontypridd.The chains are anchored at each end to twin pylons with semi-circular archways; these were constructed from bull-faced granite by Robert Mearns. Modifications were made to the north end archway in 1886 and a stone engraved with the d designed by Smith with the bridge were 3mi in length and incorporated a slow ramp from College Street on the northern side; a new road also ran from around Nigg to the Craiglug side on the south approach.An octagonal toll house also designed by Smith was originally sited on the northwest corner of the bridge. RestorationThe bridge underwent some restoration work in 1930 when steel replaced t only the main chains remained.The toll house was derelict in 1964 and was demolished soon after.Further restoration work was done on the bridge in 1984 after a replacement bridge the Queen Elizabeth II bridge was finished as this enabled the suspension bridge to be closed to vehicles. Due to safety concerns in 2002 it was also closed to pedestrians. However after Aberdeen City Council engineers undertook further work to preserve and strengthen the bridge it resumed use as a pedestrian walkway and cycle lane in 2008. The main chains were still retained. The work was carried out in four phases. The first step comprised repairing welding of the main chains and saddle chain replacement. The next stage involv



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